(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

TOBACCO REPORT 

i959-i960 




THE BULLETIN 
of the 

North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 
Number 159 March, 1960 



FOREWORD 

The ten years since the annual Tobacco Report was 
initiated have been eventful ones for North Carolina 
tobacco growers. Therefore, we hope this series of 
reports has well served the intended purpose to keep 
farmers and the tobacco industry informed of the cur- 
rent trends and outlook. 

This eleventh issue of the Tobacco Report has been 
compiled and prepared by W. P. Hedrick and J. H. 
Cyrus, tobacco specialists with the Division of Mar- 
kets, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture under the Research and Marketing Act. 

Credit is due the Cooperative Crop Reporting 
Service of the North Carolina and United States De- 
partments of Agriculture, and the Tobacco Branch of 
the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service for much 
of the statistical data contained herein. 




Commissioner of Agriculture 



For free distribution by tlie Tobacco Section, 
Marlcets Division, North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 



4/6 O 6M 

2 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

The Flue-Cured Outlook, 1960 4 

The Burley Tobacco Outlook, 1960 7 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops, 1919-1959 9 

North Carolina Burley Crops, 1928-1959 10 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments, 19 60 11 

North Carolina Burley Tobacco Allotments, 19 60 13 

State Summary, 19 59-60 14 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report, 1959-60 16 

Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales, 19 5 9-60 18 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured Tobacco 

By States, 1959 18 

Stabilization Receipts by Belts — 1959 18 

Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of North Carolina 18 

The Flue-Cured Growers Competitors 19 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

By Belts and Markets 24 

Domestic Cigarette Consumption By Kinds, 1959 Back Cover 



The dot map super-imposed on the tobacco leaf pictured on the cover shoios 
the distribution of North Carolina's tobacco acreage. Each dot represents 
500 acres. The map was prepared by the Cooperative Crop Reporting Service 
of the N. C. and U. S. Bepartments of Agriculture. The photo is by Lewis 
Watson, Raleigh, N. C. 



The Flue-Cured Outlook 1960 

The North Carolina flue-cured tobacco grower is entering the 
1960's in the best economic condition he has enjoyed in eight 
years. 

Since 1952 when the health scare threw cigarette consump- 
tion into a tail-spin, the grower has been battling back from a 
serious situation of over-production. 

In an eight year period flue-cured growers have taken a 40 
percent acreage reduction. Over-production in relation to dis- 
appearance of tobacco reached a peak in 1956 and since then, 
has been on the decline. The 1959 production of 1,079 million 
pounds will be less than disappearance by 115 million pounds. 

Growers, therefore will enter the 1960 marketing season with 
approximately a 2.7 years' supply in sight. 

The struggle of the growers to regain this balance has not been 
easy, and they are not entirely out of the woods yet. 

Cigarette production reached a new high in 1959, when 488 
billion cigarettes were manufactured, about four percent above 
1958. The growers however did not experience a parallel in- 
crease in the use of the leaf, and has not in the past five years. 
In fact the amount of flue-cured tobacco used by domestic com- 
panies is still about 100 million pounds less than was used in 
1952 to manufacture 435 billion cigarettes. 

This reduction in leaf usage has resulted from the use of recon- 
stituted tobacco and innovations in the manufacturing process, 
shifts in the consumption habits of consumers and an increase 
in the amount of imported tobacco in the blends. 

The switch of smoking habit by consumers from regular to 
filtered cigarettes has reached 50 percent of the market. Filter cig- 
arettes will probably continue to increase at a gradual rate, using 
less tobacco. 

The cigarette tax rates of 14 states were raised by one to three 
cents per pack, and California levied a tax of three cents per 
pack for the first time. 

Cigarette consumption has been increasing because of our ex- 
panding economy and ever increasing population. How long 




One out of every three hogsheads of American flue-cured tobacco 
is exported to some foreign country. 



this will continue if cigarette taxes continue to rise is question- 
able. 

Retail prices of cigarettes vary considerably, from a low of 
20.3 cents in non-tax states to 30.8 cents in high-tax states, with 
a U. S. average price of 24.4 cents. 

The export market for flue-cured has remained static for the 
past three years at 440 to 445 million pounds. 

Our tobacco growers have not been able to capture their share 
of an expanding economy in Western Europe. 

The U. S. is still the largest producer and exporter of flue-cured 
tobacco. However in the world markets, U. S. flue-cured is in 
competition with tobacco from Rhodesia, Canada and India, all 
of which countries produce and export substantial quantities of 
flue-cured tobacco. 

Rhodesia, for instance is stepping up production rapidly and 
is looking forward to expanding its export trade, as indicated by 
the following table : 



Purchased by Purchased by 

Year United Kingdom Australia 

1957 82 million pounds 9 million pounds 

1958 78 million pounds 11 million pounds 

1959 96 million pounds 11 million pounds 

Rhodesia at present is our most serious competitor, and has 
been selling tobacco recently to our former exclusive customers. 
Substantial quantities of Rhodesian tobacco went to West Ger- 
many, Netherlands and Belgium during 1959. 

Two things are needed to keep North Carolina growers in a 
competitive position in the world markets. 

First, our growers will have to produce quality leaf, using 
only recommended varieties, cultural practices, insecticides, pesti- 
cides and sucker control materials. Also, we need badly to 
improve the sorting of tobacco into uniform bundles according 
to color, length and size. 

Second, that the flue-cured price support at 90 percent of 
parity be based upon a reasonable and realistic formula, holding 
the support rate at the 1959 level for one year while this is being 
accomplished. 

These adjustments will put the grower in a stronger competi- 
tive position to expand our foreign trade. 

Acreage available for allotment in 1960 was the same for most 
farms as in 1959. A slightly larger total than last year included 
a reserve for new farms and for correcting errors. Four hun- 
dred seventy thousand acres were harvested in North Carolina 
last year. The total gross income for flue-cured growers was 
409 million dollars. 

Since legislation to freeze the price support at the 1959 level 
has become law the total gross income in 1960 should be about 
the same as 1959. 

Supplies of flue-cured on July 1, 1960, will be reduced to about 
2,100 million pounds, and with a prospective crop of about 1,100 
million pounds. 

The supply level will be about 3,200 million pounds or 2.7 
times the present rate of domestic and export use. 

The Flue-Cured Stabilization Corporation held 558 million 
pounds on February 1. This was 140 million pounds less than 
a year ago. 



Considering the amount of tobacco placed under loan during 
the past season, only 55 million pounds, it can be considered one 
of the best seasons growers have had in seven years. 

Considering all the factors affecting our tobacco economy, the 
long range outlook is for cigarette consumption to reach 570 
billion by 1965. Such an increase in manufacture of cigarettes, 
translated back to the grower, would mean gradual acreage in- 
creases beginning in the early sixties and continuing as our 
population grows. 



Burley Tobacco OuMook 1960 

Burley tobacco growers, like flue-cured growers, are entering 
the 1960 season in a better position than they have experienced 
in some years. 

In recent months, the Burley Stabilization Pool sold 170 mil- 
lion pounds of so-called surplus tobacco. The pool now has on 
hand about 85 million pounds. 

However, burley stocks held by dealers, manufacturers and 
the pool amount to 1,736 million pounds or 3.3 years supplies, 
while the desirable level of supply is 2.8 years. 

Therefore, the Secretary of Agriculture declared on February 
1 that burley allotments for 1960 would be the same as those in 
effect in 1959. 

During 1959 domestic use of burley totaled 480 million pounds, 
which was a small increase over 1958. The domestic use of 
burley is tied very closely with the manufacture of cigarettes and 
the upturn in cigarette consumption of seven percent reflected the 
increase. Though small, the increase was the first in six years. 

Exports of burley tobacco during 1959 totaled 36 million 
pounds, eight million pounds above the level of the previous 
years. West Germany is the best customer for burley tobacco, 
followed by Italy and Mexico. 

The increase in export sales was due to the strong demand 
and aggressive sales pressure of the export leaf dealers in pro- 
moting the use of blended cigarettes in foreign countries. 

The future outlook for burley tobacco in the domestic and 
foreign markets is good, provided the growers, especially in 
North Carolina, will concentrate on the production of quality 
leaf. 



During the 1959 season the amount of nondescript tobacco 
offered was more than double that of previous years, and by far 
the largest percentage on record. There was a larger amount 
of low quality leaf, partly because of barn crowding and hot 
humid weather during the curing season. 

The biggest problem was the amount of tobacco on the sales 
floor showing dirt from having been rained on after it was cut 
and left in the field. This tobacco was designated on the ware- 
house floor with "no grade." This practice cost the growers of 
Western North Carolina thousands of dollars. 

Growers should use only recommended practices to produce 
quality burley tobacco. 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 
1919-1959* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Procliictioii 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1919 


521,500 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,685 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,341 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53,50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1,661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957 


443,000 


1,469 


650,780 


358,442 


55.10 


1958 


429,000 


1,718 


736,855 


427,307 


58.00 


1959** 


461,000 


1,530 


705,365 


409,256 


58.00 



*Source : N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
**Preliminary for 1959. 



North Carolina Burley Crops 
1928-1959* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1928 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10,747 


61.80 


1957 


9,600 


1,975 


18,960 


11,073 


58.40 


1958 


9,300 


2,000 


18,600 


11,978 


64.40 


1959** 


9,800 


2,050 


20,090 


11,150 


55.50 



*Soiirce : N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
♦♦Preliminary for 1959. 

10 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments* 

1960 



County 



No. Farms 



Acres 



Rank 



Alamance 1,457 

Alexander -— 970 

Anson - 281 

Beaufort 2,491 

Bertie 1,793 

Bladen -- 3,349 

Brunswick ._ 1,791 

Cabarrus 1 

Caldwell 264 

Camden 2 

Carteret _ 415 

Caswell 1,951 

Catawba 4 

Chatham __ 1^107 

Chowan ._ _ 193 

Cleveland 1 

Columbus ._ 5,165 

Craven 1,836 

Cumberland - 2,448 

Dare 1 

Davidson 1,822 

Davie 810 

Duplin 4,559 

Durham 1,024 

Edgecombe 1,616 

Forsyth 2,248 

Franklin 2,766 

Gaston 1 

Gates 127 

Granville 2,126 

Greene 1,254 

Guilford 3,223 

Halifax _._ _. 2,233 

Harnett 3,710 

Hertford _ 1,011 

Hoke 871 

Iredell 815 

Johnston 5,510 

Jones 931 

Lee 1,311 

Lenoir 1,919 

Martin 1,557 



4,701.64 


37 


1,389.67 


50 


394.47 


61 


9,529.21 


21 


5,645.47 


32 


7,407.63 


28 


3,283.32 


42 


0.03 


72 


475.70 


59 


4.66 


66 


1,339.78 


51 


9,135.97 


23 


5.30 


65 


2,951.01 


46 


544.71 


58 


0.35 


70 


16,392.70 


7 


8,483.78 


24 


5,248.99 


34 


0.07 


71 


3,263.01 


44 


1,171.67 


53 


15,443.85 


8 


3,816.89 


39 


11,455.19 


16 


4,921.23 


35 


11,381.04 


18 


4.59 


67 


267.89 


62 


13,271.02 


13 


11,911.95 


15 


9,143.02 


22 


5,873.97 


31 


14,403.54 


11 


3,256.86 


45 


2,555.19 


47 


1,220.16 


52 


22,636.37 


2 


5,397.90 


33 


4,096.24 


38 


13,873.00 


12 


8,436.92 


25 



11 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments* 
1960 (continued) 

County No. Farms Acres Rank 



Mecklenburg _ 1 

Montgomery _. 426 

Moore -— 1,662 

Nash 3,016 

New Hanover _„ 89 

Northampton — 221 

Onslow — 1,897 

Orange 941 

Pamlico 420 

Pender 1,711 

Person __ 1,782 

Pitt .- 2,719 

Randolph 1,621 

Richmond _.-. 1,042 

Robeson 4,856 

Rockingham 3,073 

Rowan 38 

Sampson 5,385 

Scotland ■ 551 

Stokes 2,777 

Surry _. 3,194 

Tyrrell 2 

Vance 1,491 

Wake 3,892 

Warren 1,979 

Washington 297 

Wayne 3,077 

Wilkes 973 

Wilson -. 2,109 

Yadkin 2,708 

State Total 120,914 

*Source : USDA Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation. 



0.50 


69 


962.47 


56 


4,871.82 


36 


18,039.88 


5 


215.93 


63 


470.24 


60 


6,228.07 


29 


3,301.50 


40 


1,094.29 


55 


3,265.55 


43 


9,594.03 


20 


25,172.41 


1 


3,287.78 


41 


2,082.21 


48 


20,587.49 


3 


12,984.41 


14 


46.84 


64 


15,196.31 


9 


1,154.69 


54 


11,405.95 


17 


10,881.87 


19 


1.90 


68 


8,110.29 


26 


19,282.85 


4 


6,077.18 


30 


956.07 


57 


14,489.74 


10 


1,540.41 


49 


16,742.18 


6 


8,017.65 


27 


470,798.47 


1-72 



12 



N. C. Burley Tobacco Allotments* 

1960 

County No. Farms Acres Rank 



Alleghany _ 491 

Ashe 2,434 

Avery 244 

Brunswick 1 

Buncombe .— 3,041 

Burke .__. 11 

Caldwell 24 

Catawba 4 

Cherokee 178 

Clay ..- 198 

Cleveland 9 

Davidson 3 

Gaston 1 

Graham 714 

Granville .-. 1 

Haywood 2,021 

Henderson ._ 119 

Iredell 4 

Jackson 313 

Lincoln 2 

McDowell 85 

Macon 231 

Madison 2,977 

Mitchell 942 

Polk 6 

Randolph 1 

Rutherford 67 

Stokes 2 

Surry 8 

Swain 222 

Transylvania 68 

Watauga 1,620 

Wilkes 24 

Yadkin 1 

Yancey 1,890 

State Total 17,957 10,185.45 1-34 

*Source : L'SDA Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation. 



13 



219.18 


9 


1,114.44 


5 


113.20 


11 


0.10 


34 


1,645.70 


2 


4.30 


21 


9.95 


20 


1.40 


26 


64.48 


15 


81.91 


12 


2.90 


23 


1.37 


27 


0.67 


29 


344.27 


8 


0.10 


34 


1,142.94 


3 


47.20 


16 


1.70 


24 


121.67 


10 


0.30 


32 


27.34 


19 


70.26 


14 


2,570.96 


1 


515.72 


7 


1.50 


25 


0.60 


30 


30.17 


18 


0.30 


31 


0.90 


28 


70.35 


13 


32.35 


17 


802.43 


6 


3.70 


22 


0.10 


33 


1,140.99 


4 



State Summary 1959-60 



The income in North Carolina from tobacco took another back-set in 1959, 
after showing some improvement in 1958. The drop in income was due to 
lower yields in some areas and poorer quality in other areas. Both the flue- 
cured and burley crops were affected by these adverse conditions. 

The 44 flue-cured markets operating in the state in 1959 sold 683,004,915 
pounds of tobacco for producers, returning them $398,121,773. This 
gave North Carolina flue-cured growers a new record season average of $58.29 
per hundred. In 1958 growers averaged $58.16 for 719,148,970 pounds, which 
was a return of $418,226,008. Thus, the 1959 sales showed a decrease of 
36,144,055 pounds and a drop in value of $20,104,225. 

Even though the 1958 crop was considerably larger than the 1959 crop, the 
companies actually bought more tobacco from the 1959 crop than they did 
from the 1958 crop, when stabilization receipts are considered. 

Type 13 — The 1959 auction season began in North Carolina on July 30, 
with the opening of the eight Border Belt markets. The general quality of 
the crop was better than the previous year. The crop was also riper, with 
a larger percentage grading into smoking leaf grades. Average prices were 
at a record level for most grades, with increases ranging from $1.00 to $9.00 
over the previous year. Top quality grades of cutters and lugs were un- 
changed and NIL grades showed a $1.00 decline. 

Tobacco growers sold 132,082,333 pounds on North Carolina Border markets 
during the 1959 season, and received $82,374,446. This gave them a record 
high season average of $62.37 per hundred. In 1958, growers sold 125,468,940 
pounds for $75,706,287, and averaged $60.34 per hundred. 

The marketing season in this belt, which ended October 1, covered a period 
of 45 sale days. This was three days more than the 1958 season. 

Type 12 — The Eastern Belt opened for the 1959 marketing season on 
August 18, with the usual 17 markets operating. The quality of offerings 
was lower than the previous year. However, it was a more desirable smoking 
crop. Most grade average prices showed gains over the previous year from 
$1.00 to $12.00 per hundred. The largest increases were for fair to poor 
grades. 

Producer sales in this belt dropped to 328,378,308 pounds, and sold for 
$192,736,686, which was a record season average of $58.70 per hundred. In 
1958 these farmers averaged $57.71 for 370,772,702 pounds of tobacco, which 
amounted to a $213,974,404 return. 

Final sales were held in the Eastern Belt on November 5. The season cov- 
ered a period of 57 sale days as compared to 59 sale days in 1958. 

Type IIB — August 31 was the 1959 opening date for the ten Middle 
Belt markets, and by the first of October about three-fourths of the crop had 
been sold. The quality was lower, with more nondescript than the previous 

14 



year. However, there was more desirable smoking leaf in this crop. Prac- 
tically all grades showed gains in average prices from $1.00 to $5.00 per 
hundred. Leaf offerings showed the biggest gains. 

Producer sales for the season reached 122,899,800 pounds, returning growers 
$70,265,617, averaging $57.17 per hundred. This is slightly less than the 1958 
average of $57.86 that growers received for 124,296,176 pounds, which returned 
them $71,921,534. 

The Middle Belt season which ended on November 17, consisted of 55 sale 
days, which is one less than the 1958 season. 

Tj'pe llA — The nine North Carolina Old Belt markets opened for the 
1959 selling season on September 14, which was only one day earlier than the 
1958 opening. The quality of offerings in the Old Belt was very much lower 
than in 1958. This caused a decline in the general average price for this 
belt, which was considerably lower than the state average. However, about 
60 percent of the grade averages were $1.00 to $8.00 per hundred higher than 
the previous year. 

North Carolina Old Belt farmers sold 99,644,474 pounds for $52,745,024, 
which is an average of only $52.93 per hundred.- In 1958 they averaged 
$57.42 for 98,611,152 pounds of tobacco, and received $56,623,786 for their 
offerings. 

The Old Belt closing date of December 11 was the earliest on record. It 
covered a period of 62 sale days, compared to 64 in 1958. 

Type 31 — Burley markets in North Carolina at Asheville, Boone and 
West Jefferson opened for the 1959-60 marketing season on November 23. 
The quality of the burley crop was the poorest in a number of years, due 
largely to a bad curing season. The poor quality of offering resulted in a 
much lower general average than was obtained in 1958. About two percent 
of the offerings went into the pool under government loan. 

The North Carolina markets sold 17,724,068 pounds of tobacco for burley 
growers during the 1959-60 season, which returned to them $10,035,703 
giving them an average of $56.62 per hundred. During the 1958-59 marketing 
season, growers sold 16,843,834 pounds for $10,851,546, and a record average 
that year of $64.42 per hundred. 

Burley markets in North Carolina completed the 1959-60 season on Jan- 
uary 7, 1960, which was a short season of only 23 sale days, compared to 28 
days the previous year. 



15 



o 



O L.I 



c 
o 

o 



■rHC-CZjOiC^COi— ItNI 
a5!MGOi— ICDfOOOt- 
CO -* m' lO lo" O LO t-^ 

O:^ tH ':o 00 t^ t-^ i-H CO 



(MC00«0t0t0O-*iO-*C<(jOO-*OC0t0?O 
T-IOCOC^t^THdi-HOCOOi-liMCS-rHOOi-l 
OOC005tDOOt-i-H'*'<rOC«OOOTI>^a5_C<I_COr-l 

LO th i>^ o irT -^l^' oo CO -* ro oT ^ "* th c-^ to c<r 

CO-*iiHa50iCO©t-COi— lOOC^rHCOLOlM-* 

asioc-c^5 0ioiOi— iLOiocnoi-H'^'coc—o 

1—1 (M-rHUllOiHlOlM i— I C- 



C<lTj<u:iOC<105t--^C<lt-a3C5iHOr-l05T-l 
I0-*l(r001l— IC-i-iONT-li-IMrHUJtOOTH 
o5(5ioOtDOp6«3C-«OOOo6l»Ot-^M5t-^05lO 



o 
a 

on 

o 
tn 

0) 
</) 

3 

o 

o 
o 

u 
u 



o 

I- 

D 

c 



o 
u 



o 

z 



C5C/3 = 



tDOMooeqoocQ 

COOasCOLON-^IM 
C-ofl>^'*OlLO00C- 

locoLO-^moooLO 

0050-^COrHOOrH 



CO-^lGOCO-^tDOT-l 
OiCCCOi-HOOOSOO-rH 

oc--M<_^LOTi< iraio co 
oc-'^oooiOi-HcrT 

O-i-liXicOC-LOOO 
O'^'iD-5*<lrt00tDO 



OCC^OOO-^OiH 
10-*I>-COCOCT5t— (CT5 

tOi— (t— {COi-ToiCDO 

uoc—ooooios'^ir; 

OSLO LOOlOOOC-^OO 



Go 



01 

£ "S > -2 3 i= 

JZl +j rj Sh O) 

!-. C S' c o .ti 

cS (S cS 13 03 C" 



0000'X>T(<00OlX>O<X>00C0C<JC<I(MO«O<M 
<MCCiC<IOO00C0C00105f0IMLn-*C5THi— I 
OOMCOt^-^lOUtiCOasOC^lOOO-^S^JC-tD 

?D05a5^0C0005^'^i:£riO -^o c^ o i-h"co cf 
t:~Tti005C<lCOCC'OC<IOia5C-«DLOC<Oa5C<l 
CO-*IC-i-IOCO<MaiTHC^^OO(rOOOr-lTHTH 



NOO(MC«C<3(MC<l-*<M«COO(MO'MiX''iOC5 
C-C0003<NtH COCO^OCOCOOOOOOOl^LO 

-*■^ooLoeoc^coc^^HO(^a=Ol^-(^5■*•T— lo 
coa)^-^(Ni(Ntci'^C5-5ftDOicooo-^ ^'^ 

rH iH co" ^*' •*" m" to 



COOCOTfiCOOOrH'^OOLO'^C^lOlOi— (dt— 
OCOCOOO'-I'^^COOICOC^I^IOO^O^COCDCXDO 
OCOlct-T^'^C-rt-oji— (CDL^LOCOOCOCO 
COOCOcO^O^OOMi— IOitDC5COC^'*iGOiM 

u5i^c<ii:^t-OLOiM<Mcoooai_a50t>^T-Hco 
a5~THLncoO"*"c<ri>^i-^CTrooi— itocjDcococo 

tH ^i-l-*-^ LO-T-H T-l «D 



a; o ^ 






^s3t^os;-!^ooSo3^^;^rrr 



c fl 



> a 

cs >a. 

< 



CO CD t-^ c-^ irf to ■*" 00 i>^ Tt^" 

Oi^U5C~t~OUtiOOOOC<I 

lO m" CD T-T t-^ oT lo" t»h' CD t-T 



t-tDOiHfOOCDlOCDCD 
T— lOOC-TtiLOOOSOCOLO 
t-^irJcDlOoi-^'lOCDaJr-i 



(rqC0CDOO'*<MC0C0C^ 
t-OOtOC^CDOOOSOJCD'*! 
OOCOCDt— It-OOIOIOCDOO 

{^(roiocDOiT-tiocOTtiLr; 
cd,-hcom<c^cd^t-i«5i:d 



^ otccDocqcqcDooooc^ 

-I OJLOCOCDCDOCOiHOOO 
^ fOt-05rHt-t-CC'^OCD 

I" i>-coLoa5Lococrri>^->*''LO 

LOCO^O'^'Ot-COiHOO 
I LOCM-rHT-liHOO-^OOClLO 



H 



^ C^CDOOOOOOCSCOiHi— ICO 

Q KIlOlOOS-^-^-^CDOsC^ 

^ t-^tDt-^lOOlOCDcDoJT-i 

5 LOlOlOLCCOLOlOUlLOLO 



(NOOCD-^C^^tDOLOLn 
COCOCO,— (OCOLOGOt— -^ 
-*__«Dt^OOCD(M rH LOM 

COi— ICO-^C-^COCOtHi-ho" 
1— lOiLOCOCOOOCloOC^O 

■^ c^ th T— I oi oi LO c<r cd" qo 



> s 



M 



<5 o Q W fe HI h:] O M ^ 



o-*ooc<ioo-*ooo<oo 

t-C^ICDOOC^JO-^-^CO 
tD 5D im" im' cf r-T '#'" C3:r CQ 

oO'*t--t^c5'*'ooa5c<i 

CO lO CD C<r 00 GO t>^ -^ oT 



fOCOLOCDcot--^t-eo 

lOCDiHCOCDOO-^t-CJ 

c<i o o 05 oq 1-H c^' o c<i 



OS ^ 

S H 

CD fH 
CO Ej 

T-l t^ 

c 

p 
o 

g H 



Cg-^^OCDCDCOKIM 

CO C^" '*' 1-H CD T-T t>^ o" (M" 
CDiHi-It-I'*i-*COC-LO 
CnCDCDOSOt^COS^CO 
t>r CD CD ih" 00 t-^ CD LO T-T 



o>coos^o-*'#oo-* 

,HlOCOCDC^-*i-l(>qCD 
TtiOCDCOlOCOC-^lOCO 
Cq~ '^ O" LO i-T -^ O OO C<r 

COO50OCTilOO00OCvICD 



J cooooioco-^rot-i-i 



5<]CDTtioocO(r<i'*^co 

,— |CDT^COLO00O5OiCO 

iocoa5Tt<c5o^LOO^ 
CDOOcoLO'^tr^cD^nO 
COiHcOt— tOioO'^Ol 

(^c^ oi^- i>^o^(M '-l,'>:,t-^ 

t>^CDlOT-rt--l>rCD -^'CO 






p .7^ S O 



M^ g a; br £ 

llll^llil 

m C3 S g S tf Cr! cc ^ 



C^ <M 


OO ^ ■* 


CO 00 


O CD 


1— 1 -^ c^ 


CO OS 


1-1 •>* 


(M CD '^i 


CO t- 








in 'S* 


■ c^ in 1-1 


rti (Z) 


<NI C5 


'^ti O CD 


T-l O 


C<1 c- 


CD ,-H O 


CO CD 








i-H OO 


O CO lO 


CO c^ 


rH 00 


T-l 


1-1 o 



CO lO 



O Ol 
CO t- 

^CD 

o'"c<r 

CD (>5 



"* o 
CD O 



3S 



O 



OS 



OO CD CO 
U5 00 OO 
-*i LO CD 

lo CO CO 

[- 1-1 CO 

CO LO CD 



"* '^l 


W 


(M O 00 


o ^ 


to CT5 




-* o to 


O C5 


Oi lO 


M 


Tji CD C- 


CO CO 








■* c- 




CO 1— 1 CD 


T-l OJ 


o cq 


00 CD CD 


in c~ 


05 C~ 


C- CO CO 


CO o> 




H 






Cvl CO 


o ■* in 


O CO 


1-1 lO 


^^ 


T-i 


CO t- 


iH t- 






c~ 



C<1 lO 

in CO 



^ 


'l^ o 


cc 


CO 


00 1-1 l> 


CD GO 


o o_o 


o_a5 






t-" oo'oc 


^"oo" 


O ^ CD 


CO CO 


^ c^ in 


D- C-;^ 


OiCo'-5)< 


t-^o" 




iH O 








t-; 








cc 








H 








J 








H 




; C 




pq 




; o 




J 


: ^ 


J J 


^< 


^ ; ,* 


o 




<; 


ra^ 




H 



Summary of N. C. Dealer and Warehouse 
Resales — 1959-60 



Belt 


Pounds 


Dollars 


Average 
Price 


Percentage 
Resales 


Border Belt 

Dealer 
Warehouse 


4,242,631 
9,514,486 


$ 1,976,321 
5,484,756 


46.58 
57.65 


2.9 
6.5 


Eastern Belt 

Dealer 
Warehouse 


10,383,600 
20,004,332 


4,594,932 
10,444.493 


44.25 
52.21 


2.9 
5.6 


Middle Belt 

Dealer 
Warehouse 


4,641,824 
8,675,326 


2,036,391 
4,643,507 


43.87 
53.53 


3.4 
6.4 


Old Belt 
Dealer 
Warehouse 


3,797,564 
9,462,916 


1,609,543 
4,789,670 


42.38 
50.62 


3.4 
8.4 


Burley Belt 

Dealer 
Warehouse 


872,992 
1,654,740 


404,412 
868,746 


46.32 
52.50 


4.3 
8.2 



Producer and Gross Sales of Flue Cured 
Tobacco by States — 1959 



state 



Prod 


ucer 


Sales 


Gross 


Sales 


Pounds 


Average Price 


Pounds 


Average Price 


. 683,004,915 




$58.29 
54.27 
63.15 
58.27 
59.04 


753,727,594 
137,526,600 
132,663,465 
141,959,535 
18,671,798 

1,184,548,992 


$57.54 


,. 127,275,205 
. 118,516,937 


53.88 
62.48 


. 131,851,399 


57.73 


. 16,535,854 


58.77 






.1,077,184,310 


58.36 


58.04 



N. C. 
Va. . 
S. C. 
Ga. . 
Fla. . 



Total.. 



Stabilization Receipts By Belts — 1959 

Producers Stabilization Percentage 

Belt Type Sales Pounds Receipts (lbs.) Stab. Received 

Old Belt 11 A 

Middle Belt 11 B 

Eastern Belt 12 

Border Belt 13 

Ga.-Pla. Belt 14 

Total 11-14 

Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of 
North Carolina 

N. C. Tobacco Sold Out of State Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 



226,919,679 


27,557,798 


12.14 


122,899,800 


7,165,886 


5.83 


328,378,308 


7,495,194 


2.28 


250,599,270 


11,319,198 


4.51 


148,387,253 


1,757,768 
55,295,844 


1.25 


.,077,184,310 


5.13 



State 1959 [958 [959 1958 

Va 28,335,083 lbs. 31,403,911 lbs. 9,875,082 lbs. 8,347,377 lbs. 

S. C 9,187,928 6,211,573 13,972,003 14,787,757 

Ga 8,252,005 5,654,772 14,792 5,164 

Fla 20,486 23,032 —0— 1,292 

TOTAL 45,795,502 lbs. 43,293,288 lbs. 23,861,877 lbs. 23,141,590 lbs. 

18 



The Flue-Cured Growers Competitors 



For almost 300 years America has been the leading producer 
and exporter of tobacco. Immediately following World "War II 
there was a shortage of flue-cured tobacco due to scarcity of man- 
power on farms during hostilities. This — coupled with a world- 
wide shortage of U. S. currency and governmental restrictions 
on international trade — constituted the most important factor 
influencing foreign trade in tobacco. Government tobacco monop- 
olies, tariff levels, import quotas, restrictions on use of foreign 
exchange, bilateral agreements, preferential duties, guaranteed 
markets, export subsidies, manipulation of currency exchange 
rates all have tended to encourage the production of flue-cured 
tobacco in foreign areas in competition with tobacco raised in 
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. 
Today tobacco is produced to some extent in almost every country 
in the world. 

In the last 15 years, Rhodesia, a Federation of the States of 
Southern Rhodesia, Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland, has 
become a major flue-cured tobacco producing and exporting 
nation. 

Rhodesia is situated in South Central Africa, south of the 
equator with a semi-tropical climate. The area covers 485,000 
square miles or 2i^ times the flue-cured areas of the United 
States. 

Most of the country is 3,000 feet above sea level and is com- 
posed of tree and brush-covered plains. Rainfall averages about 
30 inches a year and occurs within a four or five months period. 

Rhodesia has a population of 7.5 million. Three-quarters are 
Negroes and 1.7 are Europeans, mostly British. 

The tobacco farmers are mostly British with a few transplant- 
ed Americans from the flue-cured area of North Carolina. 

Farming is done on a large scale in the area due to cheap land 
and no land taxes. The typical farm is about 2,400 acres, with 
all but about 300 acres in pasture. The crops usually include 
about 65 to 70 acres in tobacco, 70 acres in corn and 70 acres of 
other crops. 

All farms are cultivated through the use of hired native labor, 
which is by far the largest cost item. The native labor supply 
on a typical tobacco farm would be about 35 adult males, of 

19 



whom about half would be married. Somes wives and older 
children help with the transplanting, harvesting and sorting. 

Each working native receives about $6.50 per month plus a 
fixed amount for food. All told he receives about $15 to $20 per 
month. 

Since most of the natives are illiterate they have to be closely 
supervised, generally by a European, whose salary runs about 
$3,500 per year plus housing. Native workers are also furnished 
housing, usually huts, they themselves construct. 

Due to the small amount of rainfall, practically all farms use 
some form of irrigation, mostly bored wells, although some farms 
have ponds. 

Very little fertilizer is used, but its use is expanding rapidly. 
A great amount of research is being done to determine the proper 
mixture for use on the various soil types. Prices of fertilizer are 
fairly high but since the amount of its use varies so widely from 
farm to farm, no cost can be established. 

Seed beds are prepared in August, and watered by hand, until 
ready for transplanting. 

Transplanting is done mostly by hand, with a few mechanical 
transplanters, and is usually staggered over a fairly long period, 
beginning in October and ending in December. This is done to 
reduce weather risk and spread harvesting and curing over a 
long period. Harvesting is closely supervised and tobacco is 
allowed to ripen thoroughly. 

Curing barns are similar to those used in our flue-cured area, 
16' x 16' usually of brick construction. Wood is used for curing; 
recently, there has been a shift to increased use of oil, partly be- 
cause wood is becoming scarce in some areas. 

The grading or sorting, like transplanting, must be carefully 
supervised. In an average grading room there are one to four 
European supervisors to 100 natives. About 3,000 pounds are 
graded daily. Every leaf is handled carefully and is matched 
according to size, color and position on plant. Rhodesians do a 
much better job of sorting than is done in America. 

There are some commercial graders who will grade tobacco 
for $4.50 to $5.00 per hundred pounds. 

All flue-cured tobacco raised in Rhodesia is sold at auction in 
Salisbury, the only flue-cured market in Rhodesia. Salisbury 
has been the world's largest flue-cured market since 1949, when 
it sold 107 million pounds against 74 million pounds sold in 
Wilson, N. C, the previous world's leader. 

20 




Fields like these are a common sight in Southern Rhodesia, 
our strongest competitor. 



The tobacco is brought to market in bales covered with paper 
and burlap mats. The size of bale would depend on the size of 
the grade. It is then placed in rows on the warehouse floor and 
sold at auction. 

Most of the personnel running the auction are Americans 
from the flue-cured area, who make the trip to Rhodesia each 
year. 

Rhodesian flue-cured is a neutral tobacco that does not com- 
pare in flavor and aroma with tobacco raised in the United States. 
While the leaf is usually bright in color it lacks the texture and 
oil contained in American leaf. 

Until recently growers have planted the old American varieties 
such as Hicks, White-Stem Orinoco, Bonanza and Jamaica 
Wrapper. At present the tobacco industry in Rhodesia is carry- 
ing on an intensive research program and is developing local 
varieties with higher yields and heavier body. So far, some of 
the locally developed varieties show some improvement in quality, 
especially in the leaf and tip section on the plant. Yields per 



21 



acre have increased considerably where proper mixtures of ferti- 
lizer are used. 

The Federal Ministry of Agriculture has extension Workers in 
all tobacco growing areas, who work directly with the growers. 
Research work is carried on at the two main Experiment Sta- 
tions. One works on diseases, nematodes, breeding, soil and 
fertilizer. The other station is experimenting in seed bed and 
field plot work with flue-cured tobacco. Both of these stations 
are financed by assessing a fixed amount per pound of leaf sold 
on the auction markets. 

Production cost of flue-cured leaf has been reported by farmers 
as ranging from $200 to $350 per acre, with an average of $300. 
This was based on an average yield of 800 pounds, whereas the 
yield in 1959 was 868 pounds per acre. Yields have increased 
over 200 pounds per acre in the past five years. 

During 1959, Rhodesian growers sold 191 million pounds of 
flue-cured for an average of $40.20 per hundred pounds. Based 
on these figures, growers in 1959 made an average profit of $49 
per acre of tobacco or a total of $3,234 from a 66 acre tobacco 
farm. 

Unlike the American tobacco grower, who has a domestic 
market for 66 percent of the tobacco he raises, the Rhodesian 
has a domestic market for only 10 percent of the tobacco he 
raises. This is where the elements of competition in inter- 
national trade in tobacco apply. 

The American flue-cured grower has quality, flavor and aroma 
highly desirable to the foreign buyers. 

The Rhodesian flue-cured grower has only the advantage of 
price at present. In price the Rhodesian flue-cured grower has 
many advantages. First, Rhodesia is a member of the British 
Commonwealth and has a 21.5 cents a pound advantage in import 
duty going into England. Second, Rhodesian growers received 
$40.20 per hundred pounds for their tobacco in 1959. The 
American flue-cured growers received $58.00 per hundred pounds 
during the 1959 season. 

For many years few industries had such a favorable position 
as the American flue-cured grower. There were no large surplus 
producers of high-grade flue-cured leaf that was in demand by 
cigarette manufacturers all over the world. Rhodesia emerged 
after World War II as the principal beneficiary of the situation, 
primarily because it could furnish leaf on the world market at 
a price. 

22 



Can American flue-cured growers compete, and hold their 
share of the foreign markets ? 

The answer should be yes, if our growers will produce quality 
leaf, using only recommended cultural practices as to use of in- 
secticides, pesticides and sucker control materials. Also we 
need badly to improve the grading of tobacco, sorting into uni- 
form bundles according to color, length and size. 

Second, provided flue-cured growers are willing to take an 
adjustment in the price support formula, at least returning to 
the old parity concept, which was low until the early 1950's. 

These adjustments will put the American grower in a stronger 
competitive position with the Rhodesian flue-cured grower. 



23 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses 
and Operators By Belts and Markets 

N, C. BORDER BELT 

Chadbouna (one set buyers) 

Producers — A. E. & Jack Garrett 
Meyers — J. H. Harper, J. D. Hendley 
Green-Teachey — Charlie Teachey, J. C. Green 

Clai'kton (one set buyers) 

Bright Leaf — J. H. Bryant, B. F. Rivenbark, H. G. Perry 
New Clarkton Whse. — Talley Bros. & Sons 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell — A. H. Powell & Sons 

Planters — N. N. Love, Carl Meares, George Carter 

Littleton's No. 1 & 2 — O. P. Littleton 

Fairmont (4 sets buyers) 

People's Big 5^ — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 
Davis & Mitchell Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 
Holliday-Frye — E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 
Planters No. 1 & 2 — G. R. Royster, Daniel 
Square Deal 1-2-3 — W. G. Bassett 
Star Carolina 1-2-3 — W. M. Puckett 

Liberty-Twin State — P. R. Floyd, Jr.. Paul Wilson, F. P. Joyce, Joe 
Pell 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers 1 & 2 — P. L. Campbell, R. H. Barbour 
Planters — J. W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Liimberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — M. A. Roycroft. J. L. Townsend, J. Johnson 
Smith-Dixie — Furman Biggs, Sr. & Jr. 
Hedgepeth — -R. A. Hedgepeth, R. L. Rollins 
Liberty — R. E. Wilkens, R. H. Livermore 
Star, Inc. — Hogan Teater, D. T. Stephenson 
Lumberton Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

Carolina — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
New Farmers — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Crutchfield — G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield 

Lea's Big Dixie — William Townes Lea, Louie Love. Jimmy Morgan 

24 



Moore's — A. H. Moore, C. C. Mason, C. F. Jeffcoat 

Nelson's No. 1 & 2 — John H. Nelson 

Planters No. 1 & 2 — A. O. King. Jr., J. W. Peay 

Gray-Neal Farmers-Columbus County — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Carolina — Lucien Stephens, A. W. Williamson, Ernest Smith 

Liberty — J. W. Hooks, I. A. Barefoot & Sons 

Smith — Ernest Smith, Cary Bryan 

EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie 

Basnight No. 1-2-3 — L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veazey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. M. Odom, Pierce & Winborne 

Clinton 

Carolina — Mrs. McWhorter Hamilton, L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland 

Ross No. 2 — Guy R. Ross 

Farmers — H. A. Carr, J. A. Chesnut, J. J. Hill 

Dunn 

Big 4 AVarehouse — Tom Smothers, Jack Calhoun 
Planters — King Roberts. J. M. Smothers 

Farmville 

Bell's — Mrs. L. R. Bell & Sons, C. C. Ivey 

Farmers & Monk's No. 1 & 2 — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 

Planters & Prewits — Chester AYorthington, W. A. Newell, B. S. Cor- 

rell & C. Prewitt 
Lee's — Gordon Lee, Carl Rowan 

Goldsboro 

Carolina — S. G. Best, Bruce Smith 

Farmers No. 1 — S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Farmers No. 2 — S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave 

Victory — Jim Hopewell & Richard Gray 

Greenville 

Cannon's — W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers — J. A. Tripp 

Planters — E. B. Jones 

McGowan's No. 1 & 2 — C. H. McGowan 

New Carolina No. 1 v^ 2 — Floyd McGowan 

New Independent — Bob Cullipher. F. L. Blount 

Smith-Suggs — B. B. Suggs, G. V. Smith 

Bennett — Elbert Bennett 

Victory — Yock Joyner, Harold Forbes 

Raynor-Forbes — Noah Raynor, A. H. Forbes 

Keel's — Mrs. L. W. Edwards 

Harris & Rogers — R. E. Rogers 

Kinston 

Central — J. E. Jones, W. I. Herring 
Farmers — J. T. Jenkins 

25 



Kinston Cooperative — S. W. Smith 
Knott Warehouse. Inc. — K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 
Knott's New— H. G. Knott, W. E. Brewer 
New Dixie — John Jenkins, Mgr. 
Sheppard No. 1 & 2 — R. E. Sheppard 
New Central — W. I. Herring, Bill King 
The Star Warehouse No. 1 — C. J. Herring 
The Star Warehouse No. 2 — C. J. Herring 
Banner — K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 

Robersonville 

Adkins & Bailey — I. M. Little, R. K. Adkins 

Gray & Gray (Red Front) — J. H. Gray. J. W. Peay 

Planters No. 1 & 2 — H. T. Highsmith, E. G. Anderson 

Rocky Mount 

Cobb & Carlton No. 1 & 2 — W. E. Cobb, J. C. Carlton 

Mangum — Roy M. Phipps 

Planters No. 1-2-3 — W. B. Faulkner, Mgr. 

Smith No. 1 & 2— James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works & Son 

Easley Warehouse Co., Inc. — H. A. Easley, Mgr. 

Farmers Warehouse, Inc. — J. C. Holt Evans, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Smithfield 

Big Planter.? — J. B. Wooten, Mrs. W. A. Carter 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — Joe & C. E. Stephenson 

Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2 — R. A. Pearce 

Perkins Riverside — N. L. Perkins 

Wallace No. 1 & 2 — Lawrence and Dixon Wallace 

Skinner's — Frank Skinner 

Tarboro 

Clark's No. 1 <§- 2 — H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2' — W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 
Victory No. 1 & 2 — Cliff Weeks, W. L. Leggett 

Wallace 

Blanchard & Farrior — 0. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior 
Hussey No. 1 & 3 — Joe Bryant, Bill Hussey 
Sheffield's — John Sheffield 

AVasliingtoii 

Sermons No. 1 & 2 — W. J. Sermons, J. E. Roberson 
Talley-Hassell 1 & 2 — M. M. Hassell, W. G. Talley 

Wendell 

Farmers— L. R. Clark & Son 

Carolina — Fred Settle, Elton High 

Banner — C. T. Nethery, C. P. Southerland 

Liberty 1 & 2 — H. F. Harris, I. D. Medlin, J. W. Dale 

Northside — G. Dean 

26 



Wilson 

Big Dixie — E. B. Hiclis, W. C. Thompson 

Wainwriglit — G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 1-2-3 — Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Farmers — J. J. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Growers Cooperative — S. E. Griffin, Mgr. 

New Planters No. 1 & 2 — R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. W. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc. — H. H. Harris, Jr., Mgr. 

Watson — U. H. Cozart, Jr.. Pres. 

Clark's — C. R. & Boyd Clark 

New Liberty — Carl B. Renfro 

Williamston 

Carolina & Farmer — S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, E. Lilley 
Rodgers Warehouse — Urbin Rogers, Russell Rogers 
Roanoke-Dixie — Carlyle Langley, Jim Pierce 

Windsor 

Planters 1 & 2 — C. B. & B. U. Griffin, J. D. & Charles Marshall 
Heckstall — E. D. Wiggins, Mack Hux 

MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen — George Mabe, Tom Faulkner 
Planters — W. Fentriss Phillips 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hardee 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

McConnells — G. Hoover Carter 
Victory — R. L. Commer & Earl Ennis 

Durham (three sets buyers) 

Liberty — John Walker Stone 

Roycroft — H. T., M. A. & J. K. Roycroft, J. C. Currin 

Star-Brick — A. L. Carver, Cozart, Currin 

Farmers — J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

EUerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — D. B. Harris & Brim 
Richmond County — D. B. Harris & Brim 

Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyers) 
Big Top — Bill Talley 
New Deal — W. M., A. R., A. L. Talley 
Southside — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 
Goldleaf — Sherrill Akins 
Liberty — P. L. Campbell 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Banners — E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 
Carolina — M. L. High, F. H. Hicks 
Moore's Big Henderson — A. H. Moore 



27 



Farmers — W. J. Alston, Jr. 
High Price — C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner 
Liberty — George T. Robertson 
Ellington — F. H. Ellington & Sons 

Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin — A. N. Wilson, S. T. & H. B. Cottrell 
Southside A & B — Charlie Ford 
Union — G. C. Harris, N. F. Freeman 

Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner — W. L. Mitchell, Jr., David Mitchell 
Mangum-Farmers — T. B. Williams, Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott 
Fleming No. 1 & 2 — G. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin, H. G. Taylor 
Planters — C. R. Watkins, J. R. & S. J. Watkins 
Johnson — C. R. Watkins, J. R. & S. J. Watkins 
Owens No. 1 & 2 — J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 
Granville — L. S. Bryan, W. W. Yeargin 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Wood 3-W No. 1 & 2 — W. F. Wood 
Twin City 1 & 2 — W. M. Carter, T. V. Mansfield 
King Roberts 1-2-3 — King Roberts 
Castleberrys — C. N. Castleberry 

Warrenton (one set buyesr) 
Boyd's — W. P. Burwell 
Center No. 1 & 2 — M. D. Carroll 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 
Thompson — C. E. Thompson 
Currin's No. 1 & 2 — D. G. Currin & C. W. Currin 



OliD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Joe Dillard, Jule Allen 

Coble — N. C. Newman, L. O. Winstead, R. W. Rainey 

Farmers — Bill & Jack McCauley 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co. — R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 
Guilford County Whse. Co. — H. P. Smothers, W. B. Hull 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick — R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Carolina — R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Sharpe & Smith — W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 
Farmers — W. S. Smi^, H. A. Fagg 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Growers 1 & 2 — Roy Smith & Bud Rummage, J. R. Owens 
Piedmont — A. O. King, Jr., Billy Hopkins, Hush Strayhorn 

28 



Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 

Dixie 1 & 2 — Oscar L. Badgett 
Liberty — F. V. Dearmin 
Planters — Tom Jones, Buclc White 
Jones — Tom Jones, Buck White 
Hunters — J. W., J. L. Hunter 

Reidsville (one set buyers) 

Farmers-Brown — G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Leader-Watts — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Smothers — T. B. & J. M. Smothers 

Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. L. Hester 
Hyco — W. R. Jones, F. J. Hester, Geo. Walker 
Foacre — H. W. Winstead, Jr., Pres. 
Planters No. 2 — T. O. Bass 
Winstead — T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 
Pioneer — J. H. Merritt, D. L. Whitfield 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Joyce's No. 1 & 2 — O. P. Joyce, Willis Wake 
Farmers — -F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorefield 
Piedmont — J. J. Webster 
Powell — Elmer, Dillard. Marvin Powell 

Wmston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Brown— R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson 
Carolina-Star — G. H. Robertson, H. M. Bouldin 
Growers — Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 
Pepper No. 1 & 2" — Fred Owens, F. L. Kellam 
Planters — Foss Smithdeal, Frank Smithdeal, Wes Watson 
Taylor — Paul Taylor 
Big Winston — R. T. & J. F. Carter 

Cooks No. 1 & 2 — B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland, William Fowler, H. A. 
Thomas 

N. C. BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (two sets buyers — second set incomplete) 
Carolina — Farmers Federal, Inc. 
Dixie No. 1 & 2 — J. C. Adams, L. J. Hill 
Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart 

Bernard-Walker Warehouse — James E. Walker, Mgr. 
Big Burley — J. C. Adams, L. J. Hill 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Burley No. 1 & 2 — Joe E. Coleman 
Farmers Burley — Joe E. Coleman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley — C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Jarrell's — Bill Jarrell 

29 



NORTH CAROLINA 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

L. Y, Ballentine, Commissioner 
John L. Reitzel, Assistant Commissioner 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

J. Atwell Alexander Stony Point 

W. I. BissETTE Grifton 

Glenn G. Gilmore Julian 

HOYLE C. Griffin Monroe 

Claude T. Hall Roxboro 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

J. Muse McCotter New Bern 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

A. B. Slagle Franklin 



31 



DOMESTIC CrGARETTE CONSUMPTION 
BY KINDS- 1959 




Total Domestic Consumption 
463 Billion Cigarettes